HEALTHY GULF HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

Recovery and Resilience After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

LEARN ABOUT OUR PROJECT

LogoHGHC-onlyseal_Transparent

ABOUT US

 

On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in a loss of eleven lives and substantial environmental and economic losses for residents along the Gulf Coast region. In the aftermath of the spill, A University of Florida (UF) led team of researchers studied the physiological, psychological and sociological effects in order to help communities recover and prepare for future potential disasters.

OUR RESEARCH

MENTAL HEALTH

 

This research examines the psychological recovery of Gulf Coast residents and families after the oil spill. Immediately following the oil spill, many people were sad, worried, tired, and angry. However, they did their best to protect their coastal environment; preserve the fish, shellfish, and tourism industries; and provide for their families during this challenging time.

COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

 

This research focused on the ability of communities to survive and thrive following the DWH oil spill. This was accomplished by examining three areas: social vulnerability and community resilience, determining the role social networks play in resiliency, and determining the level of satisfaction with litigation.

SEAFOOD SAFETY

 

This research addresses public health concerns about seafood safety in the Gulf of Mexico following the DWH oil spill. The data focuses on self-caught inshore-harvested seafood that is important to coastal fishers and their families as part of their regular diet.

OUTREACH

 

After a community is struck with disaster, there is often a high level of uncertainty, loss of trust,  concern, and community disarray. The goal of this research was to identify resources and match those critical resources with needs of individuals, families, communities, and small businesses along the western Florida Panhandle and the Alabama coastline areas.